The student develops and justifies personal interpretations about the past (WS1, WS3, WS6). Fax: 1800 982 118, © Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, Machine readable Australian Curriculum (MRAC). This portfolio of student work shows that the student can use key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to interpret and explain patterns of change and continuity over time (WS1, WS2, WS3, WS4, WS5, WS6, WS7, WS8, WS9). By the end of Year 10, students refer to key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. History - Above satisfactory - Year 10 Portfolio summary This portfolio of student work shows that the student can use key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to interpret and explain patterns of change and continuity over time (WS1, WS2, WS3, WS4, WS5, WS6, WS7, WS8, WS9). The twentieth century became a critical period in Australia’s social, cultural, economic and political development. The Year 10 curriculum provides a study of the history of the modern world and Australia from 1918 to the present, with an emphasis on Australia in its global context. Overview content identifies important features of the period (1918 to the present) as part of an expansive chronology that helps students understand broad patterns of historical change. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their arguments, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources. Students explain the significance of events and developments from a range of perspectives. When researching, the student develops, evaluates and modifies questions to frame a historical inquiry (WS2, WS3, WS7). The student develops a range of detailed texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical argument (WS1, WS2, WS3, WS5, WS6, WS8, WS9). They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their relative importance. Historical knowledge and understanding strand This strand includes personal, family, local, state or territory, national, regional and world history. The student processes, analyses and synthesises information from a range of primary and secondary sources and uses it as evidence to answer inquiry questions (WS1, WS2, WS3, WS7). Students investigate wartime experiences through a study of World War II in depth. As such, the overview provides the broader context for the teaching of depth study content and can be built into various parts of a teaching and learning program. Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), Phone: 1300 895 563 They explain different interpretations of the past and recognise the evidence used to support these interpretations. When researching, students develop, evaluate and modify questions to frame a historical inquiry. Fax: 1800 982 118, Please select at least one year level to view the content, Please select at least one Strand to view the content, Exploring values, rights and responsibilities, Recognising culture and developing respect. These strands are interrelated and have been developed to be taught in an integrated way, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. The content provides opportunities to develop historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. The Year 10 curriculum provides a study of the history of the modern world and Australia from 1918 to the present, with an emphasis on Australia in its global context. Overview content for the Modern World and Australia includes the following: Students investigate one major global influence that has shaped Australian society in depth, including the development of the global influence during the twentieth century. How did these consequences shape the modern world? | This means that overview content can be used to give students an introduction to the historical period; to make the links to and between the depth studies, and to consolidate understanding through a review of the period. A framework for developing students’ historical knowledge, understanding and skills is provided by inquiry questions through the use and interpretation of sources. The twentieth century became a critical period in Australia’s social, cultural, economic and political development. The transformation of the modern world during a time of political turmoil, global conflict and international cooperation provides a necessary context for understanding Australia… The student investigates different interpretations of the past and analyses the evidence used to support these interpretations (WS1, WS4, WS7). Students analyse sources to identify motivations, values and attitudes. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their relative importance. The student analyses the causes and effects of events and developments and explains in detail their relative importance (WS1, WS3, WS8, WS9). Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), Phone: 1300 895 563 It is not intended to be taught in depth. They process, analyse and synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. They explain the context for people’s actions in the past. How was Australian society affected by other significant global events and changes in this period? The history content at this year level involves two strands: historical knowledge and understanding, and historical skills. The transformation of the modern world during a time of political turmoil, global conflict and international cooperation provides a necessary context for understanding Australia’s development, its place within the Asia-Pacific region and its global standing. | It was a period of industrialisation and rapid change in the ways people lived, worked and thought. Read More >> Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time. Background to the struggle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples for rights and freedoms before 1965, including the 1938 Day of Mourning and the Stolen Generations, The US civil rights movement and its influence on Australia, Methods used by civil rights activists to achieve change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and the role of ONE individual or group in the struggle, The continuing nature of efforts to secure civil rights and freedoms in Australia and throughout the world, such as the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007), Changing nature of the music, film and television industry in Australia during the post-war period, including the influence of overseas developments (such as Hollywood, Bollywood and the animation film industry in China and Japan), Australia’s contribution to international popular, The waves of post-World War II migration to Australia, including the influence of significant world events, The impact of changing government policies on Australia’s migration patterns, including abolition of the White Australia Policy, ‘Populate or Perish’, Recognising and using patterns and relationships, The impact of at least ONE world event or, The contribution of migration to Australia’s changing identity as a nation and to its international relationships, The background to environmental awareness, including the nineteenth century National Parks movement in America and Australia, The intensification of environmental effects in the twentieth century as a result of population increase, urbanisation, increasing industrial production and trade, Using fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios and rates, The growth and influence of the environment movement within Australia and overseas, and developments in ideas about the environment including the, Significant events and campaigns that contributed to popular awareness of environmental issues, such as the campaign to prevent the damming of Australia’s Gordon River, the nuclear accident at Chernobyl and the Jabiluka mine controversy in 1998, Responses of governments, including the Australian Government, and international organisations to environmental threats since the 1960s, including deforestation and climate change, Use chronological sequencing to demonstrate the relationship between events and developments in different periods and places, Estimating and calculating with whole numbers, Composing texts through speaking, writing and creating, Identify and select different kinds of questions about the past to inform, Comprehending texts through listening, reading and viewing, Identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability, Identify the origin, purpose and context of primary and, Process and synthesise information from a range of sources for use as, Evaluate the reliability and usefulness of primary and, Identify and analyse the perspectives of people from the past, Identify and analyse different historical interpretations (including their own), Develop texts, particularly descriptions and discussions that use, Select and use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies, © Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, the inter-war years between World War I and World War II, including the Treaty of Versailles, the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression, continuing efforts post-World War II to achieve lasting peace and security in the world, including Australia’s involvement in UN peacekeeping, the major movements for rights and freedom in the world and the achievement of independence by former colonies, the nature of the Cold War and Australia’s involvement in Cold War and post-Cold War conflicts (Korea, Vietnam, The Gulf Wars, Afghanistan), including the rising influence of Asian nations since the end of the Cold War, developments in technology, public health, longevity and standard of living during the twentieth century, and concern for the environment and, Machine readable Australian Curriculum (MRAC).

australian curriculum: history year 10

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